The Ways of Tyranny

Josef Stalin ordered his leading military strategist, Gen. Iona Yakir, shot at dawn on June 12, 1937, after a one-day trial for anti-Soviet activity and espionage. Yakir’s appeal of his sentence went unread; Stalin had labeled him a “rascal and prostitute.” But killing him wasn’t enough. Yakir’s younger brother Moris also was shot.  If Gen. […]

Roses in December

We’re lucky today to have another blog post written by my wife. I think you’ll love this piece as much as I do and that she’ll contribute more often. She gives us hope when we need it.   By Jan Warrington God gave us memory, the author J. M. Barrie once wrote, so that we […]

Sam for President

By Jan Warrington For Christmas 2017, my sister gave my husband and me a dish towel with a drawing of a dog seated behind a desk, and not just in any office, but the Oval Office. (We loved it!) The towel reads: “My dog would make a better president.” So true, several friends said after […]

An act of heroism

Writers, politicians, editors, and some of the public rushed to label Robert Mueller’s testimony on Wednesday “a mess” and “a disaster.” They could not be more wrong, unless of course what they wanted was entertainment. Perhaps that’s the problem; The Washington Post has assigned its theater critic to review the Democratic presidential candidates. But government and […]

On Fascism

The author Umberto Eco was uniquely qualified to recognize fascism. He was eleven years old when Italy’s tyrant Mussolini died and the boy read the words “freedom,” “dictatorship,” and “liberty” for the first time in his life. “I was reborn as a free Western man by virtue of these new words,” he wrote in a […]

The Shameless, Shameful, Shamer-In-Chief

Hello again — I’m writing again for Frank’s blog — until I start my own. Thanks so much for taking the time to read, and all comments are appreciated. — Jan By Jan Warrington The day I thought Donald Trump would be expelled from the roster of 2016 Republican presidential candidates was in July, 2015, when […]